The Simmons Voice

  • October 4Simmons all clear after active threat alert

  • October 3Dean Judy Beal to retire at the end of 2018-2019 academic year

  • September 27Simmons postpones Gwen Ifill ceremony until next year

Swiss university preserves the art of yodeling


Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Ariel Kohane

Staff Writer

Yodelling is an iconic form of music which has traditionally been used to herd sheep and other livestock through the Swiss and Austrian Alps. Its rapid change in pitch and unique use of vocal “warbling” is difficult to forget. According to Deutsche Welle, Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts (Luasa) will be the first school in Switzerland to offer such a program. Students can either get a three-year bachelor’s degree or a two-year master’s, Business Insider wrote.

Switzerland has been trying to get this genre of music UNESCO World Heritage Status since 2014, reports BBC News. The art of yodelling is over five hundred years old and has recently been re-popularised by The Sound of Music as well as a Eurovision song from 2017. This increase in popularity has led experts and professionals to develop Luasa’s new program.

The yodelling program will be selective. Only three out of four students are likely to be accepted. The courses will be taught by Nadja Räas, a renowned Swiss yodeller who has a yodelling academy in Zurich. Luasa’s music department head, Michael Kaufmann, said he wanted to implement the program sooner, but the school could not find a teacher qualified enough until they hired Räas. In an interview with St Galler Tagblatt, Kaufmann praised Räas’s abilities, saying she is “number one.”

Luasa’s new program, however, is not without controversy. The president of Switzerland’s National Federation of Yodel, Karin Niederberger, criticised the program for being “redundant,” says Tribune de Genève. She claims that in the past, university programs such as this one have not been necessary for keeping the art of yodelling alive. She and many others are afraid that the program will “cheapen” the genre.

Räas said that new students will be taught a number of vocal techniques and styles as well as the history of yodelling. She believes the entire yodelling community will benefit from the program. “Our program will only train a few people out of thousands of yodellers,” she told Tribune de Genève. “Yodelling is a living folklore that must continue to develop.”

The program will officially begin in the 2018-2019 academic year. Applications open on the 28 of February. Be sure to sign up!

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Left
  • Swiss university preserves the art of yodeling

    2017-2018

    Gay Secrets of the MFA tour unearths the museum’s queer art

  • Swiss university preserves the art of yodeling

    2017-2018

    Trump administration looks to open national parks to mining and drilling

  • Swiss university preserves the art of yodeling

    2017-2018

    Black Panther brings action and representation to Marvel fans around the world

  • Swiss university preserves the art of yodeling

    2017-2018

    UK Charity Commission launches inquiry into Oxfam for sexual harassment cover-up

  • Swiss university preserves the art of yodeling

    2017-2018

    Flu season grows in severity

  • Swiss university preserves the art of yodeling

    2017-2018

    Editorial: Our love letter to platonic relationships

  • Swiss university preserves the art of yodeling

    2017-2018

    Why I’m against the mandated reporting policy

  • Swiss university preserves the art of yodeling

    2017-2018

    Fashion Spot: Affordable Gender-Neutral Brands

  • Swiss university preserves the art of yodeling

    2017-2018

    The Simmons Monologues to debut at this year’s Vagina Monologues

  • Swiss university preserves the art of yodeling

    2017-2018

    Day Zero: When Cape Town will run out of water

Navigate Right
The Student News Site of Simmons University
Swiss university preserves the art of yodeling